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Just outside the town of Healdsburg, the 38 sustainably farmed acres of the Bucher Vineyard produce elegant and nuanced Pinot Noir for our single-vineyard bottling of the same name. Owner and farmer John Bucher has made quite a reputation for himself as a winegrower in the Russian River Valley, with the likes of Williams Selyem lobbying for fruit annually from his Westside Road estate that overlooks the Russian River. Being neighbors with the coveted Rochioli Vineyard to the south, it is easy to understand why the grapes from Bucher Vineyard are held in such high regard. We've been sourcing fruit since 2014 from a steep hillside block on the west edge of the property along with a smaller block towards the bottom of the slope adjacent to Westside Road. Bucher History As a...

The similarities and differences in Pinot Noir Clones grown in Humboldt County and Russian River Valley made by Joseph Jewell Wines. In part one of our Comparing Pinots series, we explored the differences and similarities between growing Pinot Noir in Humboldt County and the Russian River Valley in regards to acreage, soils, and climate. Read through it here if you missed it. In part two, we’ll discover how these differences and similarities manifest in the final wines of each of Joseph Jewell’s single-vineyard Pinot Noirs. We’ll break them down by their clone which will lend further understanding to where flavors and aromatics originate.   Clones Something that many wine enthusiasts don’t know about Pinot Noir is that it comes in many sizes, colors, flavors, and aromas. You can almost think of Pinot Noir as the...

Comparing Pinots: Part 1  The similarities and differences in geology and geography between Humboldt County and Russian River Valley Pinot Noir made by Joseph Jewell Wines.   Acreage Before we begin our deep dive comparison between Humboldt County and Russian River Valley Pinot Noir, it is important to have an understanding of the size of areas we’re discussing. Humboldt County is roughly 200 miles north of San Francisco with Del Norte County at its northern border, Mendocino County on its southern border,Trinity County to its east and ~150 miles of fog-shrouded Pacific coastline. Humboldt is ~2.5 million acres in total with a measly 150 acres of grape vines planted majority of which are in southern Humboldt County with one AVA (American Viticultural Area), Willow Creek, containing 30 acres in the northeastern part of the...

Where Does Vermentino Come From? If you ever venture to old-world Europe, keep your eyes peeled for wines by the name of Pigato (Liguria, Italy), Favorita (Piedmonte, Italy), or Rolle (Provence, France). All of these are localized names for Vermentino.  When exploring the Mediterranean basin you’ll find these common Vermentino names from Provence and Piedmont, to Tuscany and the islands of Sardinia and Corsica. All of these warmer climate regions near the Mediterranean provide Vermentino the optimal growing conditions with plenty of UV light to ripen easily and cooling winds from the sea. As California's wine growing regions boast a “Mediterranean climate,” you can often find great examples of Southern France and Northern Italian grape varietals. While Vermentino isn’t as common in these parts, varietals like Grenache, Syrah, Mourvedre, Cinsault, Barbera, Nebbiolo, and...

Thanks to our very brief history of rosé, we know that rosé has been made around the world for quite some time now. But how exactly is it made? Traditionally there are three ways to make rosé. Depending on who you talk to, you’ll get a different answer as to which is the “best” way to make it. Essentially, winemaking doesn’t really have any hard-and-fast rule to what is “correct.” There are rough guides of how to do things, but part of the beauty of winemaking is that it's a blend of art and science. Everyone has their interpretations, and that’s okay. As the saying goes, “ask four different winemakers a question, you’ll get 16 different answers.”   For the most part, rosé is made in the following ways… courtesy of Wine Folly Direct...

Long before the favored mantras of  “yes way rosé,” today’s favorite pink drink was popular around the known world at the time, i.e. the Mediterranean basin. And although I see your wheels turning to quickly assume that our friends in the land of berets and baguettes invented the beverage, you would be mistaken. The production and consumption of rosé dates back to the Pheonicians, circa 1550 B.C. - 300 B.C. and the Ancient Greeks, circa 600 B.C. It’s just taken us this long to associate catchy hashtags with the drink.The rosé of long ago wasn’t like the picture perfect poolside salmon pink libations we love today. The ancients actually made rosé in a manner that today many wine people might scoff at--  by watering it down. Ice cubes weren’t available,...

Making a final wine blend before bottling is as much a science as it is an art. First off, there are legal requirements that a wine must meet to hold certain designations. Those designations refer to the vintage, varietal(s), appellation, and sub-appellation. Next is understanding the purpose of the final wine. Is it meant to age for many years to come, or be enjoyed younger? This creates further parameters for how a winemaker will decide on a final wine blend that you’ll eventually enjoy in your glass. Finally, it comes down to taste. When the sum is greater than the parts, you know you've got it! Are all wines blended?? You might be surprised to learn that not all wines are blended. However, what you may not have known is that even...

Remember growing up when school was out and everyone vowed that THIS summer would be the one for the records? Well, it finally came true. With a summer fit for the history books and limited opportunities for outings, we’ve found ourselves appreciating the bounty of California produce and all that it offers even more than we usually do. So, as the season begins to wind-down, we thought we'd share some of the recipes we've been enjoying while spending more time at home and summer gardens are plentiful. photo credit: Life & Thyme Chef Neal Fraser’s Garden Pesto Pizza Pair with 2019 Raymond Burr Vineyard Vermentino Why we love it When it comes to family bonding in the kitchen, pizza is perfect for getting everyone involved, especially the kids. Whether you have a pizza competition...

"Raising our Glass to Starscape Vineyard!"   If you’re familiar with our journey here at Joseph Jewell Wines, you know we have quite the history with our “home” vineyard, Starscape Vineyard, formerly known as Floodgate Vineyard. Over the last 10 years, we’ve seen the name and ownership, as well as our relationship with the vineyard change and thrive.   From the multiple blocks and different clones we use for our Pinot and Chardonnay, to the way we process the fruit, the terroir of the vineyard is truly highlighted in the wines we produce from Starscape. Usually we highlight this vineyard with our summer vineyard dinner, but this year we will instead be featuring a special Starscape tasting menu of library wines ranging from the 2012 to 2016 vintages, available for our Seated Tasting and our...

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